Clark - Van Til Discovery

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Reepicheep

Puritan Board Freshman
I'm not an expert on the Clark-Van Til controversy by any means.

Nevertheless, having read about ten of Clark's books recently, I became intrigued by the modern division between Clarkians and Van Tillians. Not so much the particulars of the debate, but rather how nasty the arguments can be.

Anyways, on Saturday, I was at the Sangre De Cristo Seminary in Colorado where Clark's personal library is kept. I looked for some Van Til books and found some simple, but encouraging notes from Dr. Van Til to Dr. Clark. I did a blog post on what I found. Check it out.

Reepicheep: Clark, Van Til, and their common Savior
 

Frosty

Puritan Board Sophomore
Thank you Rev. Felich for sharing this. How much joy is brought forth in the heart in seeing a handwritten note "your brother in our common Saviour"!
 

Ask Mr. Religion

Flatly Unflappable
Would that all who disagree in these intra-mural debates exhibited the same charity.

From a recent blog post, the author which I cannot recall at the moment:

Titus 3:2 reminds us “To speak evil of no man, to be no brawlers, but gentle, shewing all meekness unto all men.” Even if we believe that another person is wrong and must be publicly corrected (as in a debate), we should do it in a way that shows courtesy and respect (2 Tim. 2:24; 1 Pet. 3:15–16).Titus 3:2 reminds us “To speak evil of no man, to be no brawlers, but gentle, shewing all meekness unto all men.” Even if we believe that another person is wrong and must be publicly corrected (as in a debate), we should do it in a way that shows courtesy and respect (2 Tim. 2:24; 1 Pet. 3:15–16).

In a word, you might boil it down to honor. The Bible says in 1 Peter 2:17, “Honour all men. Love the brotherhood. Fear God. Honour the king.” We have a special responsibility to give honor and respect to those in authority. But we have a general responsibility to honor all human beings. If for no other reason, we should honor them because man was created in the image of God (James 3:9).

Honor is especially crucial for leadership. God requires that leaders in the church be “grave” (Titus 3:8), which means dignified or honorable. When God commands us to honor those in authority, He implicitly commands leaders to act in a manner worthy of honor. Leaders should not let people despise them (Titus 2:15). But how? They must be examples of honorable character (1 Tim. 4:12).
 
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