Calvinism and Foundations of America? Any books?

Discussion in 'The Literary Forum' started by Rutherglen1794, May 18, 2014.

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  1. Rutherglen1794

    Rutherglen1794 Puritan Board Junior

    Hello,

    My brother is an unbeliever who is engrossed in libertarian, freedom/liberty, anti-government, and some conspiracy beliefs.

    I have been seeing quotes on the internet about John Calvin's (hence, Calvinism's) huge impact in the formation of the United States of America and freedom/liberty, etc., and I don't know anything about this topic.

    My question is: Are there any books out there about this connection between Calvinism and the foundations of America? Is it a valid connection?


    I think that knowledge about this would be a good way for our (inevitable) conversations about these things to take a Christian turn, and perhaps God would even use a book such as this to bring my brother to Himself.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated,

    Elijah
     
  2. BayouHuguenot

    BayouHuguenot Puritanboard Amanuensis

    There is a connection, but it has to be explained carefully. In a nutshell Calvinism, especially with its view of the covenant, undergirded some federal aspects of the US GOvernment. This is not to say that the Freemasons around 1776 were Calvinists in any real sense. The best book on the subject is Doug Kelly's The Emergence of Liberty in the Modern West.
     
  3. BayouHuguenot

    BayouHuguenot Puritanboard Amanuensis

    These lectures are decent and worth considering. I do think Morecraft underplays the role of Freemasony in the Constitution, but still the rest is good.
     
  4. Rutherglen1794

    Rutherglen1794 Puritan Board Junior

    Thank you very much Jacob, I will look into these resources.
     
  5. Rutherglen1794

    Rutherglen1794 Puritan Board Junior

    Does anyone know if the books by David W. Hall on this subject are any good?
     
  6. BayouHuguenot

    BayouHuguenot Puritanboard Amanuensis

    He is a good scholar and worth considering. I sometimes think he overplays the "democracy" connection (simply because the word democracy changed connotations after 1789), but he is certainly worth reading.
     
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