An Integrated Reading of Psalms 1 and 2

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AV1611

Puritan Board Senior
If you have access to this article then make sure you read it!! This article has been a major influence on my reading of the Psalter.

Cole, R. (2002) "An Integrated Reading of Psalms 1 and 2", Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, 26(4), pp. 75-88

An analysis of how Psalms 1 and 2 are integrated reveals that both have as their central theme the identical royal and Joshua-like figure who is given absolute victory in battle. The principal focus of Psalm 1 when read in concert with Psalm 2 is not Torah nor wisdom, but rather this individual of kingly and military trappings. These ascriptions of Psalm 1 are made explicit in Psalm 2, where he is portrayed in close relationship with Yahweh as his anointed king and son. His opponents are the scoffing wicked of Psalm 1, identified more specifically as the conspiring earthly kings and nations in Psalm 2. This cabal revolts against Yahweh and his anointed, an action which elicits the question ‘Why?’ from the speaker in 2.1 because of the promise in 1.5, 6. Yahweh and his anointed respond appropriately to the earthly scoffing with laughter and derision from heaven. Psalm 2 then concludes with a reaffirmation of the same judgment promised at the conclusion of Psalm 1.​
 

aleksanderpolo

Puritan Board Freshman
I thought they are one Psalm in TNK? Anyone has additional resources of how the Psalms are divided and organized in TNK?
 

AV1611

Puritan Board Senior
Both Psalms 1 and 2 are joined together as one by the Jews. There is strong linguistic and thematic evidence to count them as 1 also. :)
 

MW

Puritanboard Amanuensis
Acts 13:33, "it is also written in the second psalm." They are two different psalms which ought to be read as a couplet. Alexander's comments introducing Psalm 2 present a more sound approach to the way the first two Psalms are to be understood: "The contrast indicated in the first is carried out and rendered more distinct in the second." The first Psalm is obviously concerned with Torah because not only is the Law explicitly mentioned, but the blessings and curses which accompany it are clearly depicted.
 
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