Amazing Free Will How Sweet the Sound?

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Puritanhead

Puritan Board Professor
:pilgrim: I'm a sovereign grace guy... I sing Amazing Grace how sweet the sound not Amazing Free Will!

Man's problem is not the lack of a will per say, but rather that he is in bondage to his will, and that will is to sin. Nothing save the grace of God, the free unmerited grace of Jesus can free man from that bondage. Some Calvinists wrestle with whether not they believe in so called "free will." The problem is Christian world reads the salvific inference into man's will. Something about being "dead in sins and trespasses," goes against a man freely seeking God. I freely embraced the Gospel of Grace, because he God first loved me, and God renewed my depraved heart, mind and will. Dead men don't raise themselves as Lazarus' resurrection was not a cooperative joint venture between Jesus and Lazarus.

Ian Paisley once said some preachers think man's heart is depraved, his mind is corrupt, but his will is pretty good. Sovereign grace people have to stand up for the Gospel and repudiate cult of "will-worship" in the spirit of 2 Tim. 2:24, of course, by quoting Scripture and explaining total depravity and the limitations of man's will.

[Edited on 12-20-2004 by Puritanhead]
 

fredtgreco

Vanilla Westminsterian
Staff member
Brian,

I am an ex-law firm lawyer (Michigan Law grad) and current RTS Jackson student. Email me (or U2U) let's talk.
 

Puritanhead

Puritan Board Professor
I was thinking RTS via distance ed initially... and Knox perhaps later. Some of my friends from Liberty have been telling me to goto Southern in Louisville... All of these schools have good teachers. I've considered all three since my senior year at Liberty. I'm told R.C. Senior has been sick and busy recently, and you probably won't get to study under him at Knox these days... he might speak at a convocation every so often. Anybody know first hand about Sproul teaching?

"It may be a bit too much of a stereotype, but in the 1800s and early 1900s, Episcopalians controlled the money in the nation, Presbyterians controlled the scholarship, and Baptists and Methodists controlled the numbers, that is, the majority of the Protestants. Baptist theologians like James P. Boyce received their theological training from the Princeton theologians like the Hodges and the Alexanders. Other theologians looked to Presbyterians and admired their scholarship. Taking out a Presbyterian theologian was a hefty coup d´tat." "”Ben House, Grace Covenant Church, Texarkana, AR

:book2:
If you cannot beat the Presbyterians than join em. I guess it should say something about the prowess of Presbyterian theologians that I look to so many of them for edification, training, and insight. Though, I'm hooked on my creedo-baptism, my 1689 confession, Jon Edwards and C.H. Spurgeon.

How many Baptists does it take to screw in a lightbulb?
:scholar::bigsmile:
 
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