A book on the French Revolution?

Eoghan

Puritan Board Senior
I think it was Schaeffer who first explained the French Revolution which was "man based" confused and bloody. This was in contrast to the British "revolution" which was measured and faith based. Cromwell was a puritan and his revolution was very different.

Reading Victor Klemperer's book documenting the rise of Hitler, he reflected that it was like the Jacobin's in France. I was intrigued by his observation and wish to know more of the French Revolution and The Terror.

Which books give a good perspectrive on the revolution?
 

LadyCalvinist

Puritan Board Junior
Someone on the PB recommended the The Revolution Against The Church by Michel Vovelle. But I agree with Jacob, the American Revolution was a limited revolution; even though many of the founding fathers were deists, they still had some idea of man's sinfulness, they were not trying to create a utopia. The French Revolution was a revolt against all authority, the King, the church, all churches really, and anything that stood in their way of creating a Utopia. As all Utopias it ended with a mountain of slaughtered people who disagreed with their Utopia.
 
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Eoghan

Puritan Board Senior
Reading the story of the Khmer Rouge I was struck by their attempt to do away with money and redefine how people lived. They banned mother, father, husband and wife - shades of Nancy Pelosi there!
 

ZackF

Puritan Board Post-Graduate
Reading the story of the Khmer Rouge I was struck by their attempt to do away with money and redefine how people lived. They banned mother, father, husband and wife - shades of Nancy Pelosi there!
Edited: Lords Day.
 

bookslover

Puritan Board Doctor
The French Revolution: A History (1837) by the Scottish writer, Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881). Available as an Oxford World's Classics paperback.

Carlyle's very vivid, almost expressionistic style is not for everyone. But Charles Spurgeon read it several times, Charles Dickens kept it as his night-stand reading for years, and Mark Twain said it is one of the best books ever written. High praise, indeed.
 
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