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Thread: Sing a New Song: Recovering Psalm Singing for the Twenty-First Century by J. Beeke

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  1. #1

    Sing a New Song: Recovering Psalm Singing for the Twenty-First Century by J. Beeke

    Sing a New Song: Recovering Psalm Singing for the Twenty-First Century - Reformation Heritage Books (Hope the link works!)

    Publisher's Description: The book of Psalms occupies a unique place in Scripture, being both the Word from God and words to God from His people. Unfortunately, psalm singing no longer plays an integral part of worship in most evangelical churches. In this book, thirteen well-respected scholars urge the church to rediscover the treasure of the Psalms as they examine the history of psalm singing in the church, present biblical reasons for the liturgical practice, and articulate the practical value it provides us today.
    Contents:

    Foreword: W. Robert Godfrey

    Part I: Psalm Singing in History

    Chapter 1 Hughes Oliphant Old and Robert Cathcart: “From Cassian to Cranmer: Singing the Psalms from Ancient Times until the Dawning of the Reformation”

    Chapter 2 Joel R. Beeke: “Psalm Singing in Calvin and the Puritans”

    Chapter 3 Terry Johnson: “The History of Psalm Singing in the Christian Church”

    Chapter 4 D. G. Hart: “Psalters, Hymnals, Worship Wars, and American Presbyterian Piety”

    Part II: Psalm Singing in Scripture

    Chapter 5 Rowland Ward: “Psalm Singing and Scripture”

    Chapter 6 Michael LeFebvre: “The Hymns of Christ: The Old Testament Formation of the New Testament Hymnal”

    Chapter 7 David P. Murray: “Christian Cursing?”

    Chapter 8 Malcolm Watts: “The Case for Psalmody, with Some Reference to The Psalter’s Sufficiency for Christian Worship”

    Part III: Psalm Singing and the Twenty-First-Century Church

    Chapter 9 Anthony T. Selvaggio: “Psalm Singing and Redemptive-Historical Hermeneutics: Geerhardus Vos’s ‘Eschatology of the Psalter’ Revisited”

    Chapter 10 Derek Thomas: “Psalm Singing and Pastoral Theology”

    Chapter 11 J. V. Fesko: “Psalmody and Prayer”

  2. #2
    Thanks! Looks like a good read.
    Michael Cope
    Westminster Presbyterian Church - PCA (Covenanter by conviction)
    Fort Myers, FL

    "Some people have greatness thrust upon them. Very few have excellence thrust upon them...They achieve it. They do not achieve it unwittingly by 'doing what comes naturally' and they don't stumble into it in the course of amusing themselves. All excellence involves discipline and tenacity of purpose." John Gardner

  3. #3
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    Cool!
    Rev. Benjamin P. Glaser, M. Div, ARP
    Pastor, Ellisville Presbyterian Church, ARP
    Ellisville, Mississippi

    ‎‎""The Christian religion is the religion of sinners, of such as have sinned, and in whom sin in some measure still dwells. The Christian life is a life of continued repentance, humiliation for and mortification of sin, of continual faith in, thankfulness for, and love to the Redeemer, and hopeful joyful expectation of a day of glorious redemption, in which the believer shall be fully and finally acquitted, and sin abolished for ever."
    -- Matthew Henry on 1 John 1:9


    Blogging at: Mountains and Magnolias and The Confessional ARP

  4. #4
    Bought with the non-money I have.
    Elder Andrew Barnes (PCA)
    Christ Presbyterian Church (Kansas City, MO)
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  5. #5
    charliezl Guest
    Very interesting. I'd like to know if it includes different kinds of psalter and each of their history.

  6. #6
    Is it promoting EP or just psalm singing in general? Looks like a good book.
    John Lanier
    Covenant Presbyterian Church (OPC) - LaGrange, GA
    Lanett, AL

  7. #7
    That is correct judging from the authors. I believe there has been a strong movement amongst the confessional reformed toward more psalm singing irrespective of EP in this country which goes back at least as far as the PCA's Trinity psalter project. This is what makes the FC's declension so disappointing. They are retreating from a sounder practice while there has been some advancement in the churches here toward sounder worship practices.
    Quote Originally Posted by Romans922 View Post
    The guys on there are mostly non-EP, but they are promoting the singing of Psalms, which has all but died in the Church.
    Quote Originally Posted by John Lanier View Post
    Is it promoting EP or just psalm singing in general? Looks like a good book.
    Chris Coldwell, Lakewood Presbyterian Church (PCA), Dallas, Texas.
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  8. #8
    The guys on there are mostly non-EP, but they are promoting the singing of Psalms, which has all but died in the Church.
    Elder Andrew Barnes (PCA)
    Christ Presbyterian Church (Kansas City, MO)
    Sermon Audio
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