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Thread: Monastery

  1. #1

    Monastery

    I know that Catholics have monasteries but I was wondering if there are any "Protestant" or, even better, Reformed monasteries? I would love to be able to spend a few weeks and in peace and quiet. Does anyone know of anything like this?
    Joseph Scibbe
    Chaplain Assistant
    Fort Lewis, WA

    1 Thessalonians 2:4
    but just as we have been approved by God to be entrusted with the gospel, so we speak, not to please man, but to please God who tests our hearts.

    http://twitter.com/just_joe_scibbe

  2. #2
    Jason
    Particular Baptist
    Ontario, Canada
    twitter
    Feileadh Mor
    YouTube

    We must remember that literally all our salvation is in Christ. - Herman Hoeksema

  3. #3
    Have you checked out L'abri Fellowship? L'Abri Fellowship International : The Official Website
    J Baldwin
    Keowee Presbyterian Church, PCA
    Pickens, SC
    “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself.” Luke 10:27

    Check Out My Blog: http://reflectjoy.blogspot.com/

  4. #4
    There's hermitages and retreats all over the US. These are valuable for a few days of rest. The Christian life should be one of community primarily, but even Jesus got away to rest awhile. Taking a break doesn't mean you've turned ascetic. Happy resting.
    Pergamum


    "If a commission by an earthly king is considered a honor, how can a commission by a Heavenly King be considered a sacrifice?"
    -- David Livingstone

  5. #5
    The Prayer Foundation
    Look at these guys... non- denom. monks some intresting links, etc.
    Gregg
    East Texas
    Member Heritage Baptist Church
    "I eagerly expect and hope that I will in no way
    be ashamed, but will have sufficient courage so
    that now, as always, Christ will be exalted in my
    life." Phil 1:20

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by JBaldwin View Post
    Have you checked out L'abri Fellowship? L'Abri Fellowship International : The Official Website
    Some of my friends have done L'Abri and they've loved it. In addition to having quiet time to engage in private study, there's also times of group discussion and fellowship - and everyone pitches in with the daily chores. If I ever am able, I would love to go for a few weeks.
    Kathleen M
    nondenominational
    Montana

  7. #7
    I just want a monk outfit. I think that would be good enough for me. Make some wine...carry some water in a bucket...make cheese...smash grapes with my feet. Oh yeah, and pray and read the bible. But, the last two won't be anything new.
    Aaron Josh Wright
    Elder of Discipleship
    Grace Family Baptist, Spring TX
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/search.as...d=Aaron_Wright

  8. #8
    What about Montana?

    Theognome
    Bill Cunningham
    Covenant Reformed Church, URC
    Kansas City
    There are three kinds of people- those who can count, and those who can't.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Joshua View Post
    That being said, there's nothing wrong with seeking solitude in order to engage in private worship, but this is not the same thing as monasticism. God has not called us to monasticism, but to attend His appointed means of Grace. He wants us to obey and submit to Him in our current circumstances and stations, collectively being the "City on a Hill" and light in the darkness, for His Crown and His Covenant.
    Monasticism arose when martyrdom ended. IOW, when the faith became comfortable with the world (and vice versa), then the misguided idea of a super-spirituality arose.
    Kevin Guillory
    Pastor
    Redeemer Christian Congregation
    Baltimore, MD

    I don't interpret Scripture. Scripture
    interprets itself. And in the process ...
    Scripture interprets me!

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Unashamed 116 View Post
    I know that Catholics have monasteries but I was wondering if there are any "Protestant" or, even better, Reformed monasteries? I would love to be able to spend a few weeks and in peace and quiet. Does anyone know of anything like this?
    I've often thought about the same thing.
    Jim
    Elder
    First Presbyterian Church of Honolulu
    at Ko'olau (PCUSA)
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    "The truth is, all our time is made up of present time, and all we need to care is, that we may all the time do the best we can for our great Creator this present minute." -- Henry Opukaha'ia, first Hawaiian Christian and New England evangelist (1814)

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Staphlobob View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Joshua View Post
    That being said, there's nothing wrong with seeking solitude in order to engage in private worship, but this is not the same thing as monasticism. God has not called us to monasticism, but to attend His appointed means of Grace. He wants us to obey and submit to Him in our current circumstances and stations, collectively being the "City on a Hill" and light in the darkness, for His Crown and His Covenant.
    Monasticism arose when martyrdom ended. IOW, when the faith became comfortable with the world (and vice versa), then the misguided idea of a super-spirituality arose.
    I'm not sure I would agree with this. The Essenes were a "monastic" Jewish community before the time of Christ, and though John the Baptist was in solitude, he lived in the desert and could be viewed at least partially as monastic ... if his disciples lived with him, it would be very similar to monasticism. I would also state that while martyrdom may have subsided for a time, it certainly has not ended.
    Brian Withnell
    Deacon, OPC
    Leesburg, Virginia

    You cannot train for war in the midst of a battle. Prepare before the battle starts; if the battle is long and hard, you will wish you had.

  12. #12
    a lot of the monks were very missionary and they used these monasteries as outposts in a pagan world and a forward base of operations for evangelism. Many of these monks were not "monastic" at all, if by that you mean ascetic and solitary.
    Pergamum


    "If a commission by an earthly king is considered a honor, how can a commission by a Heavenly King be considered a sacrifice?"
    -- David Livingstone

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Withnell View Post
    I'm not sure I would agree with this. The Essenes were a "monastic" Jewish community before the time of Christ, and though John the Baptist was in solitude, he lived in the desert and could be viewed at least partially as monastic ... if his disciples lived with him, it would be very similar to monasticism. I would also state that while martyrdom may have subsided for a time, it certainly has not ended.
    You are correct about the Essenes. However I'm not talking about them, but so-called "Christian" monasticism.

    That martyrdom hasn't ended is not at question either, but I did have in mind the likes of Nero and Diocletian. History is rather clear on this issue. Once the persecutions (in the Roman empire) ended and "Christianity" became popular, then monasticism and asceticism arose as a counter-balance to that "broad evangelicalism."

    What began as a reaction to the social acceptance of Christianity in general became the recognition and institutionalization of monasticism. Hence the rise of the Cluniacs, Cistercians, etc. There was an attempt by the Franciscan friars to respond to the wealth and ease of the monastics, but they also devolved into gnostic "super Christians" (e.g, "brother ass", the stigmata, etc.)

    Having gone through several incarnations since then, contemporary monastism is merely gnosticism-lite. Popularized by the likes of Merton and the Shalem Institute, one can find relaxation, quiet time, Reki, the Enneagram, a labyrinth, etc., all in a weekend of pretend monaticism.

    OTOH, protestants merely stick with the Word, sacraments, prayer, and fellowship. However, that by itself is sufficient to raise the ire of the world and bring about persecution and martyrdom. Monkery - in whatever form - is always hunky-dory with the world. It's Christians they hate.
    Kevin Guillory
    Pastor
    Redeemer Christian Congregation
    Baltimore, MD

    I don't interpret Scripture. Scripture
    interprets itself. And in the process ...
    Scripture interprets me!

  14. #14
    That's a simplistic explanation.

    All was not hunky-dory with the monks. They died by the droves by the Viking and barbarian sword.
    Pergamum


    "If a commission by an earthly king is considered a honor, how can a commission by a Heavenly King be considered a sacrifice?"
    -- David Livingstone

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Unashamed 116 View Post
    I know that Catholics have monasteries but I was wondering if there are any "Protestant" or, even better, Reformed monasteries? I would love to be able to spend a few weeks and in peace and quiet. Does anyone know of anything like this?
    Check with some church camps in your area. Some have small cabins to rent during their off season.
    Lance G. Marshall
    Pastor
    New Albany, Indiana

    Soli Deo Gloria

  16. #16
    Jesus clearly savored time away from everyday hub-bub to enjoy fellowship with His Father, and I believe it can be hugely beneficial to have time primarily devoted to private worship. Here in Virginia, we have Machen Retreat and Conference Center which encourages families to spend time away from the rat-race. Machen Retreat and Conference Center

    L'Abri does not necessarily provide a retreat. You will spend half the day in guided study and the other half of the day doing work to support L'Abri (they quickly figured out that I bake!).
    JWithnell
    Member Bethel OPC
    Virginia
    http://learningyesican.blogspot.com/
    http://bethelpres.com/

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Pergamum View Post
    That's a simplistic explanation.

    All was not hunky-dory with the monks. They died by the droves by the Viking and barbarian sword.
    The vikings/barbarians killed them for their possessions, not their faith.
    Kevin Guillory
    Pastor
    Redeemer Christian Congregation
    Baltimore, MD

    I don't interpret Scripture. Scripture
    interprets itself. And in the process ...
    Scripture interprets me!

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