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Thread: Jehovah's battle against the Sea and other demons

  1. #1

    Jehovah's battle against the Sea and other demons

    Ancient Near East Myths had their Gods usually battle against the forces of chaos, the primordial muck and the sea. (i.e. Tiamat in the Enuma Elish. Leviathan, etc.)

    To what extent did the OT adopt this imagery in order to show that Jehovah was supreme over all?

    Did the OT use demonic imagery from the ancient near east to show God's superiority over these demons?

    Did the writers use the beliefs about certain demons that were believed to be true by their pagan neighbors and weave them into the OT canon to show that Jehovah was stronger?

    And if so, does this mean that the OT confirms that these were true demons (i.e. some demon that resembled Tiamat existed, or Lilith in Isaiah 34:14, or Hairy goat demons in Isaiah 34:14 and 13:21)?
    Pergamum


    "If a commission by an earthly king is considered a honor, how can a commission by a Heavenly King be considered a sacrifice?"
    -- David Livingstone

  2. #2
    Did the Hebrews not like water?


    In the psalms they were always praying to be delivered from it - despite not being a seafaring nation.



    And in Revelation, there is no more sea right?
    Pergamum


    "If a commission by an earthly king is considered a honor, how can a commission by a Heavenly King be considered a sacrifice?"
    -- David Livingstone

  3. #3
    Did the Hebrews not like water?
    I seem to remember a lot of imagery that showed that water = life. The Torah is often referred to as mayim by the rabbis of the Talmud.

    Too much water? Well, that's another story...
    Kevin, husband of a truly angelic woman, and father to twelve.
    Zion United Reformed Church of Sheffield
    Ontario, Canada

  4. #4
    Jesus rebuked the wind and the waves, which may have had some relation to the demon possessed pigs (if I remember correctly).
    Brad
    Deacon
    Redeemer Church, PCA
    Jackson, MS

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