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Thread: Did Nebuchadnezzer come to saving faith in God?

  1. #1

    Did Nebuchadnezzer come to saving faith in God?



    Did Nebuchadnezzer become a believer?
    Bill Brown
    Grace Baptist Church


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    I believe he did. You may wish to consult Stuart Olyott's Dare to Stand Alone for a defence of this view. And I believe E.J. Young also takes this position.

    Most of the older commentators disagree, but if Nebuchadnezzar was not saved, then I am not sure who ever has been. Keep in mind that his profession of faith in the sovereign God was a lot stronger than that of most Arminian Christians today.
    Daniel
    Attending a confessional Anglican congregation, but a Covenanter Presbyterian by conviction
    Northern Ireland
    "May that happy period soon arrive when the unclouded glory of divine revelation will shine from pole to pole; when men every where will see eye to eye, in all things that are connected with divine glory, and with their own eternal felicity." William Stavely (Irish Covenanter), An appeal to light (1796), pp 143-4

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by North Jersey Baptist View Post
    Did Nebuchadnezzer become a believer?
    I am not convinced that he did, but I would be happy to be wrong
    Richard
    CofE
    UK

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    Quote Originally Posted by AV1611 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by North Jersey Baptist View Post
    Did Nebuchadnezzer become a believer?
    I am not convinced that he did, but I would be happy to be wrong
    Since there is nothing in the Biblical text to say that he did not, then surely the judgment of charity must cause us to conclude that he was?
    Daniel
    Attending a confessional Anglican congregation, but a Covenanter Presbyterian by conviction
    Northern Ireland
    "May that happy period soon arrive when the unclouded glory of divine revelation will shine from pole to pole; when men every where will see eye to eye, in all things that are connected with divine glory, and with their own eternal felicity." William Stavely (Irish Covenanter), An appeal to light (1796), pp 143-4

  5. #5
    I wonder whether a parallel an be drawn between Nebuchadnezzer's confession and Nineveh's repentance in Jonah? Interesting.
    Bill Brown
    Grace Baptist Church


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    Quote Originally Posted by North Jersey Baptist View Post
    I wonder whether a parallel an be drawn between Nebuchadnezzer's confession and Nineveh's repentance in Jonah? Interesting.
    Didn't Nebuchadnezzar die shortly after this? So that we cannot proffer any reason why his profession was not genuine?
    Daniel
    Attending a confessional Anglican congregation, but a Covenanter Presbyterian by conviction
    Northern Ireland
    "May that happy period soon arrive when the unclouded glory of divine revelation will shine from pole to pole; when men every where will see eye to eye, in all things that are connected with divine glory, and with their own eternal felicity." William Stavely (Irish Covenanter), An appeal to light (1796), pp 143-4

  7. #7
    Daniel,

    I believe he did die shortly thereafter.

    Daniel seemed to have an affection for Nebuchadnezzar. Daniel said to the king:

    Daniel 4:19 19 "Then Daniel, whose name is Belteshazzar, was appalled for a while as his thoughts alarmed him. The king responded and said, 'Belteshazzar, do not let the dream or its interpretation alarm you.' Belteshazzar replied, 'My lord, if only the dream applied to those who hate you and its interpretation to your adversaries!
    Notice that Nebuchadnezzar does not react in anger against Daniel for his foreboding interpretation. At the end of the interpretation Daniel says:

    Daniel 4:27 27 'Therefore, O king, may my advice be pleasing to you: break away now from your sins by doing righteousness and from your iniquities by showing mercy to the poor, in case there may be a prolonging of your prosperity.'
    Daniel did not share the same affection for Belshazzar, Nebuchadnezzar's son. When summoned to interpret the handwriting on the wall, and after being offered gifts and a promotion, Daniel said:

    Daniel 5:17 17 Then Daniel answered and said before the king, "Keep your gifts for yourself or give your rewards to someone else; however, I will read the inscription to the king and make the interpretation known to him.
    Daniel 5:22 22 "Yet you, his son, Belshazzar, have not humbled your heart, even though you knew all this,
    Notice that Daniel never pleaded with Belshazzar to change his ways.
    Bill Brown
    Grace Baptist Church


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    I agree with Daniel. Nebuchadnezzar, I believe, gave a credible and beautiful profession of faith.
    Rev. Benjamin P. Glaser, M. Div, ARP
    Pastor, Ellisville Presbyterian Church, ARP
    Ellisville, Mississippi

    ‎‎""The Christian religion is the religion of sinners, of such as have sinned, and in whom sin in some measure still dwells. The Christian life is a life of continued repentance, humiliation for and mortification of sin, of continual faith in, thankfulness for, and love to the Redeemer, and hopeful joyful expectation of a day of glorious redemption, in which the believer shall be fully and finally acquitted, and sin abolished for ever."
    -- Matthew Henry on 1 John 1:9


    Blogging at: Mountains and Magnolias and The Confessional ARP

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  10. #10
    I don't see by what grounds one would say that he did not come to saving faith in God.
    And ditto to Daniel Ritchie "Keep in mind that his profession of faith in the sovereign God was a lot stronger than that of most Arminian Christians today."
    Benjamin
    Member - Presbyterian Reformed Church, Columbus, Indiana

    “In death it will be your joy that ye have ventured all ye have for Christ; and there is not a promise of heaven made but to such as are willing to suffer for it. It is a castle taken by force.”. — Samuel Rutherford

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by AV1611 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by North Jersey Baptist View Post
    Did Nebuchadnezzer become a believer?
    I am not convinced that he did, but I would be happy to be wrong
    I agree

  12. #12
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    I agree with Daniel Ritchie too, esp his great sentence about the profession of faith better than arminian church's! I don't think that someone could say things about God the way Nebuchadnezzer did unless he was saved. (It was recorded by Daniel and is the word of God, so if he was faking, it would have said so or not been written down)
    Timothy Johnson
    First United Presbyterian of Moline
    PCUSA (Yea, I know)
    Theology/Philosophy Sunday School Teacher
    Davenport, IA

  13. #13
    I hope so, but I don't know so.
    Jonathan Hunt

    Pastor, Morton Baptist Church Thornbury, South Gloucestershire, United Kingdom since 2012

    Logic is a systematic method of coming to the wrong conclusion with confidence. -- Thomas Elsworth

    *Please note* I've been a member of this board for over ten years. Things I wrote in 2004 and intervening years do not neccessarily represent my attitudes or positions now. Thank you!

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by North Jersey Baptist View Post
    I wonder whether a parallel an be drawn between Nebuchadnezzer's confession and Nineveh's repentance in Jonah? Interesting.
    I'm not sure what you could mean here. Maybe I misunderstood. But if this is pointing out a possible relationship in time and location, the two won't go together. I might get a few details wrong here, but overall the record is pretty close. And the spelling of names may be off too.
    Nebuchadnezzar was the king of Babylon (the Chaldeans). Nineveh was the capital of Assyria. The chronology of power lied in Assyria, Babylon and then the Persians and the Medes before Alexander the Great invaded the region (Wasn't it Xerxes I, the Persian, to set out to destroy Athens and was met by the 300 Spartans at Battle of Thermopylae? That would have been about 480 B.C.).
    In the late 800s Shalmanezer (sp?) III was the king. Jehu bowed down to him and swore Israel's fealty to Assyria, but Judah did not. Shortly after this would have been the time of Jonah, around 790. Then, in the late 700s Tiglath Peneser came against Judah after King Uzziah died (735). It is speculated that Nineveh's repentance accounts for her relative silence during the first half of the 700s. Nebuchadnezzar wasn't until later, obviously.

    Well, it goes something like that. Perhaps our resident historians can correct my mistakes. The point is, the repentance of Nineveh and Nebuchadnezzar are not related in location or time.
    For the Glory of our King,
    Joe Johnson
    Slave of Christ, husband, father, grandfather and TMS graduate. Personal website - SoundLife.org
    I do not know, and I do not say, that a person cannot believe in Revelation and in evolution, too, for a man may believe that which is infinitely wise and also that which is only asinine. ~ CHS

  15. Quote Originally Posted by Wannabee View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by North Jersey Baptist View Post
    I wonder whether a parallel an be drawn between Nebuchadnezzer's confession and Nineveh's repentance in Jonah? Interesting.
    I'm not sure what you could mean here. Maybe I misunderstood. But if this is pointing out a possible relationship in time and location, the two won't go together. I might get a few details wrong here, but overall the record is pretty close. And the spelling of names may be off too.
    Nebuchadnezzar was the king of Babylon (the Chaldeans). Nineveh was the capital of Assyria. The chronology of power lied in Assyria, Babylon and then the Persians and the Medes before Alexander the Great invaded the region (Wasn't it Xerxes I, the Persian, to set out to destroy Athens and was met by the 300 Spartans at Battle of Thermopylae? That would have been about 480 B.C.).
    In the late 800s Shalmanezer (sp?) III was the king. Jehu bowed down to him and swore Israel's fealty to Assyria, but Judah did not. Shortly after this would have been the time of Jonah, around 790. Then, in the late 700s Tiglath Peneser came against Judah after King Uzziah died (735). It is speculated that Nineveh's repentance accounts for her relative silence during the first half of the 700s. Nebuchadnezzar wasn't until later, obviously.

    Well, it goes something like that. Perhaps our resident historians can correct my mistakes. The point is, the repentance of Nineveh and Nebuchadnezzar are not related in location or time.
    I was looking at the larger picture, the fact that two heathen kings repented in the face of judgment (one realized, the other impending). It displays God's grace even to gentiles.
    Bill Brown
    Grace Baptist Church


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